Author Of The Week: Dr Amos N. Wilson

“All of us may not live to see the higher accomplishments of an African empire, so strong and powerful as to compel the respect of mankind, but we in our lifetime can so work and act as to make the dream a possibility within another generation.” — Marcus Garvey

Dr. Amos N. Wilson was born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, on February 23, 1941. He completed his undergraduate degree at the Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, mastered at The New School for Social Research, and attained a Ph.D. degree from Fordham University in New York. Wilson worked as a psychologist, social caseworker, supervising probation officer and as a training administrator in the New York City Department of Juvenile Justice. As an academic, Wilson also taught at the City University of New York from 1981 to 1986 and at the College of New Rochelle from 1987 to 1995.

Wilson believed the vast power differentials between Africans and non-Africans was the major social problem of the 21st century. He believed these power differentials, and not simply racist attitudes, was chiefly responsible for the existence of racism, and the continuing domination of people of African descent across the globe—white people exercise racism because they have the power to do so. Wilson passed on January 14, 1995

“When we get into social amnesia—into forgetting our history—we also forget or misinterpret the history and motives of others as well as our motives. The way to learn of our own creation, how we came to be what we are, is getting to know ourselves. It is through getting to know the self intimately that we get to know the forces that shaped us as a self. Therefore knowing the self becomes a knowledge of the world. A deep study of Black History is the most profound way to learn about the psychology of Europeans and to understand the psychology that flows from their history.

If we don’t know ourselves, not only are we a puzzle to ourselves; other people are also a puzzle to us as well. We assume the wrong identity and identify ourselves with our enemies. If we don’t know who we are then we are whomever somebody tells us we are.”

Wilson believed that the vast power differentials between Africans and non-Africans was the major social problem of the 21st century.He believed these power differentials, and not simply racist attitudes, was chiefly responsible for the existence of racism, and the continuing domination of people of African descent across the globe.

As a scholar of African studies, Wilson felt that the social, political and economic problems that Blacks faced, the world over, were unlike those of other ethnic groups; and thus, he argued that the concept of “equal education” ought to be abandoned in favor of a philosophy and approach appropriate to their own needs. Wilson argued that the function of education and intelligence was to solve the problems particular to a people and nation, and to secure that people and nation’s biological survival. Any philosophy of education or approach which failed to do so was inadequate.

The idea that we must necessarily arrive at a point greater than that reached by our ancestors could possibly be an illusion. The idea that somehow according to some great universal principle we are going to be in a better condition than our ancestors is an illusion which often results from not studying history and recognizing that progressions and regressions occur; that integrations and disintegrations occur in history.

—Amos Wilson, The Falsification of Afrikan Consciousness

Wilson further argued that the mythological notion of progress to which many Blacks subscribe, was a false one; that integration could only occur and persist, as a social-economic reality, so long as the U.S. and global economies continued to expand.If such an economic situation were ever to reverse, or change for the worst, then the consequences which would follow could end up resulting in increased racial conflict; thus he urged Blacks to consider disintegration as a realistic possibility — to prepare for all hypothetical scenarios — with the understanding that integration was not guaranteed to last forever.

Wilson also believed that racism was a structurally and institutionally driven phenomenon derived from the inequities of power relations between groups, and could persist even if and when more overt expressions of it were no longer present.Racism, then, could only be neutralized by transforming society (structurally) and the system of power relations.

Here is a list of the book he has written:

  • The Developmental Psychology of the Black Child (1978)
  • Black-on-Black Violence: The Psycho-dynamics of Black Self-Annihilation in Service of White Domination (1990)
  • Understanding Black Male Adolescent Violence: Its Prevention and Remediation (1992)
  • Awakening the Natural Genius of Black Children (1992)
  • The Falsification of Afrikan Consciousness: Eurocentric History, Psychiatry and the Politics of White Supremacy (1993)
  • Blueprint for Black Power: A Moral, Political and Economic Imperative for the Twenty-First Century (1998)
  • Afrikan-Centered Consciousness Versus the New World Order: Garveyism in the Age of Globalism (1999)
  • The Developmental Psychology of the Black Child — Second Edition (2014)
  • Issues of Manhood in Black and White: An Incisive Look at Masculinity and the Societal Definition of Afrikan Man (2016)

His books are a must read.

Happy Reading

reference: Wikipedia

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s